Tag Archives: Interview

Get to know: Feline and Strange

Know Me Better were recently in conversation with Feline Lang, one half of Berlin based electro-wave cabaret act,  Feline and Strange, who are ready to unleash their out-there sounds to the world.

How did you get your initial start in music?

I was born into it… seriously. My parents are classical musicians, I was bred in a womb that supported a concert harp, played with bricks under a grand piano, and started to learn the violin within 4 years. Thus I am sorry to say that it is beyond even my abilities to remember the initial moment!

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

I want to become a household name and fill the biggest arenas in the world, and have my music sent on the next gold disc that goes out into the universe to represent humanity – who doesn’t? Anything below that wouldn´t justify a musician´s life which is serious shit most of the time. But then there´s these magic moments when you play for hundred, fifty, maybe just  two people, and you REALLY touch them, and you know that´s why you do this. Happens rather frequently to me lately.

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

I have been writing the odd song or arrangement since school days, but it all became really serious in 2009 after learning my tools through arranging operas for pop and folk bands with my own troupe.

 

Who are your top three influences and why?

Do I really have to choose from a world full of music? OK, first three that pop to my mind. Mozart, because he wrote music everyone can enjoy but few can understand. Depeche Mode, because their top defined sound is what defines pop music for me, and they proved like no one else that you can be epic without an orchestra. Nina Hagen, because she, in turn, proved that you can be a punk on any instrument and in any language.

 

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

I wrote this album in only 2 weeks, away from home, while Germany was turning upside down, from welcoming refugees with soft toys and water bottles at train stations, to burning down camps and marching against the government who let people seek help. I watched the news, and didn´t find any ways to help. So I wrote the album and made it, together with the now-released CD artwork, a pathetic glimpse into the feeling of suddenly losing your home, your right to survive, without warning, or alternative. What happens when you are evicted from planet Earth? And somebody you never met decides over your fate? The album tries to put you into this perspective. But it´s just a game. A play.

 

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

We´re from Berlin! Well, we´re extraterrestrials obviously, but I guess most of Berlin´s inhabitants are. I like ballroom dancing a lot, especially Sing, and Tango, and I love swimming, so my favourite location is a tiny lake in the city, the Weissensee, where in summer balls are held at the shore, sometimes with live performances – we played there too – and after dancing your heart out, you can jump into the lake and swim, have a cocktail, and feel like a VIP in Monaco. Only dirtier.

 

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

You should definitely check out The Jackaffair! They do Latin Fun Punk, and support us very often. And I only recently met Les Pleureuses, who are as wacky as we are.

 

Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

If you want to know all that´s going on, join The Feline&Strange Spaceship Crew on www.facebook.com/groups/felineandstrange! I spend a lot of time there, and reveal a lot of what´s in my head. Even closer you can get if you become a patron on www.patreon.com/feline , of course, getting early access, exclusive releases, and can actually influence my work. When I need help, I call out there, and listen! But the best first steps into the Feline and Strange universe is, of course, via our webpage www.felineandstrange.com. And if you are like, leave me in peace with all that stuff, I just want the music – did you know you can stream (and buy for your own price) ALL our music on http://felineandstrange.bandcamp.com?!

 

Check out the video for ‘No Life On Mars’ here:

Get to know: Les Kirsh

Les Kirsh has been writing catchy soul-influenced tunes since the 60s/70s, but has suffered more than his fair share of set backs. Now he’s back with a few remastered and mixed versions of old songs, reworked for a modern audience. Know Me Better managed to get 5 minutes with the talented songwriter:

 

How did you get your initial start in music?

After being in quite a few bands since school, I answered an advert in the Melody Maker and met with George Young and Harry Vanda (of The Easybeats) which which led to my first record deal with Phillips.

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

To have my songs covered by other artists and to be known as much as a writer as I am a singer.

How long have you been writing your own music?

On and off since the 60s

Who are your top three influences and why?

My ultimate influence is Otis Redding, later followed by Rod Stewart and Lionel Richie. These are artists I feel put a lot of soul and feeling into their music and lyrics.

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

They are three completely different songs – two of which I feel tell a story and one is a fun, party song with a Four Tops Reggae feel. I enjoy writing all styles of music. 

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

Im currently living In Essex – I don’t really have a favourite – each venue always has its own special feel.

Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music

There is plenty more to come and some already out there. Feel free to check youtube where you will find some other of my songs including the original ‘Tell Me To My Face’. My newest tracks are on sound cloud too.

https://soundcloud.com/leskirsh

https://www.facebook.com/LesKirshMusic/

https://twitter.com/LesKirshMusic

 

Listen to ‘Tell Me To My Face’ here:

Get to know: Vispa

Know Me Better were lucky enough to get in touch with Iranian electronic artist, Vispa, whose retro-synth sounds are making waves in the modern world of electro music.

How did you get your initial start in music?

I’ve had a talent in composing since my childhood. But at the age of 19, I attended my first music class and perfected my skill on playing keyboards and synthesizers. After that, I self-studied harmony, counterpoint and orchestration amongst other things.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

My ultimate goal in the industry is to attract attention as an electronic musician with different ideas and become famous. And money is also important to me 🙂

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

Since 5 or 6 years ago. But ‘Cosmic Force’ is my first professionally recorded song. I have a whole load of other songs that have not been recorded yet though.

 

Who are your top three influences and why?

Jean-Michel Jarre, Vangelis and Hans Zimmer.

I think that these three people are unique in that they employ perfect ideas in their work because of their talent. Also, they have the best possible musical influences – you can see it in their arrangements and their style of music.

 

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

This is just the beginning of my work. These days I’m looking for a sponsor and I decided to record an EP with the same name (Cosmic Force) which contains three different remixes of the song.

 

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favorite venues?

I live in Tehran, Iran. Actually there are not as many venues as you think there might be here. But there are some, like Azadi Tower which I think best suits an open-door concert. There are also two nice indoor venues here which I enjoy going to.

 

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Actually I don’t listen to Iranian pop music, but simple or traditional Iranian music are among the best which I like and maybe in the future, I will employ a sense of this music in my work. Among Iranian musicians in the international scene of traditional music are Kayhan Kalhor, Homayoon Shajarian and Hossein Alizadeh.

 

Give our readers a roundup of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

My song is now available in 95+ online stores and streamers. But the most important ones are as follows:

Also, you can find me on social media here:

 

Listen to Vispa’s ‘Cosmic Force’ here:

 

Get to know: My Heart is a Metronome

We were lucky enough to have an extended interview with Swedish Indie-pop up-and-comers, My Heart is a Metronome. Here’s what they had to say:

 

How did you get you initial start in music?

We started out as a band about 4 years ago. Well, actually, it all started with Mattis Malinen (vocals and guitar) who wrote a whole lot of music on his own and then busked the streets throughout Europe. When he came back home to Sweden he felt the songs lacked a rhythm section. This is where Gustaf Simonsson (bass) and Felix Carlsten (drums) joined the band.

Mattis used to collect live videos on his hard-drive when he was around 15. One day he found a video of the band System of a Down playing a show at Big day out festival. The guitarist Daron Malakian was acting crazy, running around stage, spinning around, throwing himself on the ground to play a solo. This is what got Mattis into playing guitar. The rest is history.

Gustaf had been interested in music for his whole life. Growing up in a family with his mother who was an opera singer and grandpa who was a cantor, it was no coincidence Gustaf started to play music at a young age. He did his first live performance as a newborn baby, representing “the new year” at a big gala party. He used to perform on every big family occasion singing funny songs alone on stage. When he was 9 years old he began learning how to play the guitar. He was really focused to learn how to play a clean barre chord. He tried and tried, but did not succeed. He got so disappointed and sad that he climbed into a closet, held the door shut from the inside and refused to get out. That is what you call a real musician! Legend says he still walks into his closet when he can’t figure out the right chord for a song.

When it comes to Felix he literally started playing the drums on ice cream boxes, saucepan lids and plastic toys when he was 14 years old. He also liked to go to the kitchen, open the pantry and oven and hit everything that would make a sound. At last, his parents got so annoyed (impressed?) that they finally bought him a drum kit. However, we like to believe that they bought him the drum kit as they thought he had talent. Funny thing is that it is the same drum kit as he plays on the song ‘Feel Think’.

As a band, My Heart is a Metronome takes inspiration from almost everything. Might sound like a cliché, but that’s the truth. We listen to all kinds of music and if the music is good, it’s something to be inspired by.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

The ultimate goal for My Heart is a Metronome would be touring worldwide, making a living off of our music. We all LOVE to play live, so to get the chance to tour all year long would be awesome.

We’re probably expected to say something like “our aim is world domination” or “we want to be the next big thing!”. But basically, for us it’s all about touring and playing our music live in front of our fans, on whatever “level” this might be.

 

How long have you been writing you own music?

Since the start, as we said earlier, My Heart is a Metronome started as a solo project, hence Mattis wrote the music himself. Now as a band we are writing all the music together in our rehearsal space. We feel that when we write everything together we bring out the best out of each other and that the synergy works best that way. However, Mattis writes all the lyrics on his own.

 

Who are you top three influences and why?

We all listen to different kinds of music and therefore also have different backgrounds, but we feel that it gives us a flexibility and creativity that makes us write cool stuff. We try not to get restricted to what we SHOULD sound like – but how we WANT to sound like. One day we might want to be sound frantic and noisy, another day we might want to sound more chill.

But to answer the question, here’s a few artists we’re listening to at the moment:

Wintersleep

Bon Iver

Hey Rosetta!

 

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Well of course there is! First of all, you can find all of our songs on Spotify, SoundCloud and Youtube.

The release is named ‘Tierp’ after the small town that Mattis and Gustaf grew up in (and Felix visited to play football matches). It is said that the jackdaws are flying up and down because they don’t want to see the ugly town. This is why the artwork for the EP ‘Tierp’ consists of a jackdaw flying up and down. We can say that this is a tribute to Tierp, the town that has been named ‘the ugliest town in Sweden’.

 

Where are you based and what’s you local scene like? Any favourite venues?

We’re based in a city called Uppsala, close to Stockholm. The local scene in Uppsala is quite all right. You see, Uppsala is a student city which means that there’s a lot of things going on all the time. So when we play in Uppsala, our main target group is students who love to party! But the favourite venue in Uppsala must be either Katalin or the basement stage down in our rehearsal space complex.

 

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Well we must say ‘Acidiun’! Really heavy stuff. The drummer in Acidiun used to perform as a percussionist at our shows, so we support each other.

Besides that we have ‘Struts’ which is Gustaf and Mattis’ second band. Felix says that it is his favourite band in Uppsala!

 

Give our readers a round up where they can find you online and hear more of your music

Oops already dropped a few places online… But what the heck, we can do it again.

To find us online and to get to know us even better you can visit us on:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/myheartisametronome/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/myheartisametronome

Twitter: https://twitter.com/mhiamband

Snapchat: @mhiamband

Web page: http://www.myheartisametronome.com

 

Find our music here:

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/4aaBqtuCgkgQce4h3lZKDc

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFncrO21DCA

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/myheartisametronome-1

 

Thank you for showing interest in our music!

Get to Know: Indie-Electronic Artist Atticus

How did you get your initial start in music?

I was into songwriting from an early age, almost by accident. My first memory of it was primary school. We were doing a song in class the next day and the teacher asked if anyone could play the guitar. Nobody put there hand up so I did. I thought, how hard can it be? Turns out it was hard and I stayed up well past my bedtime learning the song on my mums old guitar. I later taught myself piano and the basics of production.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

Weirdly I haven’t thought about my eventual aim, I make music because I love making music. Sometimes I wrote to help myself through personal situations. I guess it’s the more soulful and emotional stuff that cuts through. If my music can really resonate with one person then that’s not a failure right?

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

When my mum died at 16 my music really kicked on as I put down on paper all of the confusion I was feeling at that point. I’m 24 and the emotion that drove that music is still very much prevalent in what I make now. Only the way in which I create has evolved.

 

Who are your top three influences and why?

Ooooh that’s a tough one. As with many people my parents were a big influence on what I listened to. I still remember the 6 cd changer in my dads car. Bowie and Fleetwood mac (‘roomers’ of course). Bowie certainly influenced my style, in the staccato way in which I compose, allowing raw vocals plenty of space to cut through. More recently I’ve listened to a lot of Chet Faker (Nick Murphy) he’s all about dynamics in his music, something I’ve tried to encapsulate in mine.

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

It was written out of a desire to be appreciated by my pears. Something I care much less about now, but it’s still relevant. Music, relationships, life isn’t easy and sometimes you can be banging on the door for so long until someone hears you.

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I’m living in London now but I’m from Leeds. The Leeds music scene has so much history of bringing soul and indie music together. I really got a buzz from playing in old venues like the 360 club and the Brude (Brudenell social club). London is different again, and the 02 arena is a different kettle of fish.

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

I worked with a band called Sam Scout a bit. They are insane.

Give our readers a roundup of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

My debut song ‘these walls’ launches on the 24th but if they are really nice to me I’ll come play it in their bedrooms. Follow me on Facebook @officialATTICUS.

 

Links:

https://soundcloud.com/officialatticus

https://www.facebook.com/officialATTICUS

Get to Know: Elsiane

How did you get your initial start in music?

We each have different backgrounds individually but as a band we started jamming in the year 2000 – just vocals, drums and guitar, then started writing some songs. The first song that we did together was ‘Vaporous’. After that we ended up recording several demo EPs and did some shows in Montreal

Elsieanne: I started singing at the age of 6 and grew up in a family of musicians. At the age of 12 started playing guitar and then violin. It was after seeing my grand father perform with his orchestra and later seeing Phil Collins live that I wanted to become a musician/singer

Stephane: From an early age I became musically aware – music was first an escape and I was passionate about starting a band, but It wasn’t until the age of 16 when I knew I wanted to play the drums. For me music started by playing in a band.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

Elsieanne: My aim in the industry is to be able to continue staying true to our work and not have to change who you are in order to please others.

I wish the industry did not want to change artists to become more commercial all because they need to make money. It would be great if labels would develop artists to their max potential and let them be.

Stephane : My ultimate aim would be to keep continuing on this path that we have already being on for the last 16 years as a band. In terms of goals, I would like to see our music get proper sync licenses, to find the right home for the songs. Our music can be described as cinematic in many ways, and a perfect for film soundtracks. I want more people to discover this music by playing shows as well as continuing recording albums and to continue generating a steady fan base.

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

Elsieanne: Since the age of 13. I recorded my first demo EP at 14 with just guitar and vocals.

Stephane: I have always been in bands that creates original music. With the band Elsiane, 17 years.

 

Who are your top three influences and why? 

Elsieanne: Peter Gabriel, Yma Sumac, Massive Attack

First major influence: Tool because they are a band that has always followed their own rules, and kept the mystery in what they have always done. Their art is as important as music and they have never shied away from that. They have proved that you can get away with what you want in the music industry. As a drummer, I was very influenced by compositional drummers like Danny Carey from Tool.

Second influence: Massive Attack because they have created a unique style of music which has inspired me for many years. The darker elements of Massive Attack are what I enjoy the most as well as the different collaborations they do with the many talented singers and musicians involved with the band.

Third: NIN (Trent Reznor) because he continuously tries to push the envelope with every new album and has never let his guard down.

 

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Elsieanne: This album is made to inspire other artists to stay true to who they are and not give up no matter how hard the road may be.

Stephane: We would rather people make up their own minds about what they hear on this album, but I guess that you must see the darkness before you can see the light.

 

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

We’re based in Montreal. Indie rock seems to be a favourite here since the early 2000s. There’s a big electronic scene as well, we don’t pay too much attention on what’s happening here but some favourite venues include: Club Soda, La Tulipe, Gesu, Place des Arts.

 

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Caroline Plante, Curious Case, Patrick Watson.

 

Check out more on Elsiane here:

Links:

http://www.elsiane.com/

https://www.facebook.com/elsiane

https://twitter.com/elsiane

https://www.instagram.com/elsiane_official/

https://soundcloud.com/elsiane

https://www.youtube.com/user/vaporous07/videos

Get To Know: Warsaw Radio

  1. How did you get your initial start in music?

As band we all come from different backgrounds with different influences including rock, pop and classical. Nicola Bates (violin & vocals) has toured with the English Orchestra and Sting, Brían McNamara (lead singer/guitarist) comes from a folk rock background and honed his craft playing venues in bars from New York to San Francisco and Dublin. Laurence Bridge (Bass guitar) has performed in the past with likes of Lucie Barrat (sister of the famous Libertine) and Tom Odell. We’ve merged these influences together to create a unique sound.

 

  1. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry

To make music and to try and stick around for as long as we can.

 

  1. How long have you been writing your own music?

We’ve been writing together since we started the band in Brighton in 2013.

 

  1. Who are your top three influences and why?

Our sound taps from a well of music that includes Wilco, Fleetwood Mac and The Waterboys. They influence us as they have made some incredible music that will stand the test of time.

 

  1. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Its available on Spotify, Amazon and ITunes from March 10th

 

  1. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

We’re based in the sea-side town of Brighton. The local scene is a vibrant one with great venues such as The Hope & Ruin and The Green Door Store. We feel lucky to call it home.

 

  1. Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Rotait are an incredible two piece alt-rock act (cello and drums – think Damien Rice meets The White Stripes) and Paul Murray is one of the finest solo troubadours we’ve seen.

 

  1. Give our readers a roundup of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

You can find us on all the usual music media channels – Spotify, You Tube,  Amazon, ITunes etc

Follow us on Twitter / FB for all the latest news & gig updates:

facebook.com/warsawradio

twitter.com/warsawradio