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Irontown Diehards Interview

  1. How did you get your initial start in music?

I’ve been playing bass since I was 11 years old, my friends had started a band and there were already 2 guitar players and a drummer. My best friend’s older brother taught me how to read tabs and taught me my first couple of songs to get me started. I didn’t actually get my first bass until I was 12 so if I wanted to play bass I had to go to my friend’s house, in the meantime I would practise on an old classical guitar we had in the house!

  1. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

One foot in front of the other. I try not to think about an “ultimate aim” and rather set one goal and move towards it, once completed set a new one. At the moment the goal is to get the album out to as many people as humanly possible, after that who knows?

  1. How long have you been writing your own music?

I’ve been playing in bands doing original material since I was 17, it’s not easy making that change from learning other people’s music to writing your own. I would liken it to when a child is learning how to talk, they start by imitating their parents and then the other kids around before they start to find their own voice.

  1. Who are your top three influences and why?

Influences are a strange thing. I can tell you straight off that my 3 biggest influences are John Paul Jones of Led Zeppelin, Flea from the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Billy Sheehan from Mr. Big. All 3 are exceptional world class bass players but their individual roles in their 3 bands are so different. I also don’t necessarily think that influences will always translate into the music you play, the 3 bands I’ve just mentioned probably wouldn’t who would spring to mind if you listened to The Irontown Diehards or even my bass playing. But they’re always the 3 I come back to and the ones who I’d most like to emulate.

  1. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

That it’s awesome! Out of the 4 members of the band this is the first album I’ve been on. I’ve done Eps before but this is my first ever album and that feeling of all that effort and work to put in is such a satisfying thing when you get the end result and I honestly think that people are going to really enjoy it.

  1. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

We’re all from Belfast, Northern Ireland. A wonderful city with a shall we say…..coloured past? Asides from that there are some legendary venues here, the Ulster Hall has so much musical history. It was there that Led Zeppelin first played Stairway to Heaven and Black Dog live. The city has a great pedigree in music not just rock but across all genres.

  1. Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

There’s quite a few! I’d like to give a shout out to our dear friend Steve Moore playing in Stormzone and Fireland who are just fantastic. The rest can speak for themselves!

  1. Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

Like us on facebook, follow us on twitter. Our videos are on youtube and the album will be available on iTunes, amazon and Spotify from 27th May!

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Halo

 

halo 6a1. How did you get your initial start in music?

I used to go to the studio with my friends just to hang out while they were doing their thing, i got the bug from just always being in that environment with people creating music, it looked fun and it turned out to be just that

2. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

To be performing at the biggest venues all over the world and writing for the biggest artists in the world too.

3. How long have you been writing your own music?

I write all my own music, so around 6 to 7 years

4. Who are your top three influences and why?

In no order

Jay Z – coming from the bottom and achieving all he has as a business man

Timbaland – continuously maintaining a high standard of music and pushing boundaries for so long and he’s still popping

Ryan Tedder – he’s a beast as a songwriter

5. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Its lifestyle music, its music that you can play at anytime and it’ll make you feel some type of way….and you’ll wanna hear it over and over again….so go and listen to it, buy it and let everybody know about it

6. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I’m currently based in London, the London scene is amazing because you have so many variety of cultures and music, you’ll never get bored and you’ll always find something fresh….Brixton O2 Academy because it was the first stage that i ever performed on as a proper artist

7. Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Oh wow, way too many…eerrrmmm wretch 32

8. Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

I’m on instagram, twitter, facebook just search for itshalomusic and you can also hop on my website www.itshalomusic.com

Apple Of My Eye

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1. How did you get your initial start in music
We’ve all been singing and playing all our lives. We all grew up separately surrounded by music. So unsurprisingly, when we started hanging out, the music just happened of it’s own accord. It’s our way of having a good time.

2. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?
We want to tell stories to as many people as possible. We want every one of your readers to come to an apple of my eye gig in the next month and buy our album.
And then we want to go on top of the pops. Does that still exist? Jules Holland would be nice!
Alternatively, a definition of success would be to wander into a folk club somewhere in England and hear someone singing an Apple song, and claim it as an old song from 100 years ago. We would buy that person a cider.

3. How long have you been writing your own music?
For as long as we’ve been friends. Writing songs is what we do when we hang out together. It’s all very collaborative. One of us might come with a fragment of melody, or half a lyric, or a story. And then the beer and cider comes out, along with all the instruments … And three hours later we have a beautiful new song. Or sometimes not. I guess we’ve been writing songs like that for about ten years but Apple of my Eye have existed in it’s current form for around four years.

4. Who are your top three influences and why?
We listen to lots of stuff. Recently we’ve been listening to Lau, Lisa Knapp, Moulettes and the Punch Brothers who are all brilliant, but more generally, we’ve been submerged in traditional English, Irish and Scottish music – and that’s probably the major influence.

5. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?
The previous album was all about devils. This new one – Seven Tides – is full of songs about the sea. We didn’t set out to write songs to a theme, they just came out that way. There’s obviously a long tradition of sea songs in folk music, shanties and so on – and for some reason it felt like a natural place to go when writing over the last couple of years. For us, songs are for expressing ideas and feelings through fantastical stories and images. And the sea offers such a great set of images and associations – journeying, danger and the unknown.

6. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?
The London folk scene is really strong at the moment – loads of amazing artists and there are lots of great venues. The Woodburner night is excellent – it moves around a bit but is at Chats Palace in Homerton at the moment. The Harrison in Kings Cross and the Gladstone in London Bridge are also excellent. Jamboree venue in Limehouse is a favourite – they have fantastic music nearly every night.

7. Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?
There’s so much, it’s hard to know where to start. But Sam Lee, Theo Bard, Brooke Sharkey, Whiskey Moon Face, Franky and the Jacks and Ellie Rose Rusbridge are particular favourites – all very different, but all doing something really exciting with folk-influenced music. Ellie was in AOME until fairly recently, and features on the new album.

8. Give our readers a roundup of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

applesinlondon.com

http://www.facebook.com/applesinlondon

twitter – @applesinlondon

soundcloud.com/apple-of-my-eye

appleofmyeye.bandcamp.com

Adam Protz

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1. How did you get your initial start in music?

The very first musical note I would have played would have been on the ocarina at school! I grew up playing classical instruments, but I remember I really started taking music seriously when I started listening to rock music as a teenager. I’d say that explains why I love writing music for classical instruments like the piano, but with pop influences and the added edge of electronics.

2. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

I used to just want to be a film composer, but I then realised I also want to just release music and tour it also! Some composers who do similar stuff to me are actively doing all three of those things – if I could achieve that, I’d be a very happy bunny!

3. How long have you been writing your own music?

Since I was fifteen.

4. Who are your top three influences and why?

Nils Frahm also writes piano based music, but it goes a lot deeper than that. He completely changed the way I see recording – he uses analog and tape machines and gets such a rich, warm sound. I wouldn’t know about this stuff if it wasn’t for him.
Ludovico Einaudi, purely because he was the first artist I was aware of who was writing solo piano music with classical and pop influences. I probably wouldn’t be doing this if it wasn’t for him.
I strongly believe that people are influenced on a conscious and subconcious level by virtually everything they encounter in life – that probably won’t do for a third answer, so let’s just say Fleetwood Mac as they’re my favourite band currently! You can watch a cover of one of their songs I did on my Youtube channel.

5. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Not too much to be honest – I’m all for different people listening and forming their own interpretations, I really love that. Maybe just to listen out for a brief journey from a dark place to a place of great positivity.

6. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I live just outside London in St Albans. The local scene is mainly based in the many pubs, not always so great for me as I don’t really write ‘pub music’! But it’s only a short trip in to London so it’s not such a problem.

7. Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

I would definitely recommend you Google Sam Kelly and Rae Kelly (no relation!).

8. Give our readers a roundup of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

Yes sure. I’d say the most happening places for me are my website – http://www.adamprotz.com – where you can listen to and download lovely things. My Facebook page gets updated all the time – http://www.facebook.com/adamprotzmusic Also there’s some great music videos and live videos on my Youtube channel – http://www.youtube.com/adamprotz
Would love to chat to you all on Twitter also! I’m @AdmProtz

Shane Thomas

SHANE THOMAS01

  1. How did you get your initial start in music?

I got my initial break, when I visited the famous Yehudi Menuhin Music School.
The headmaster said he had never met a child composer like me before and then
he went on ITN news to talk about my talent, which led to my Dad getting lots of
calls from radio and T.V shows.

  1. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

My ultimate aim in the music industry is to become the first child to have successful
singles/albums, as a composer. A lot of people don’t think it’s possible in 2014, but
I don’t pay any attention to that.

  1. How long have you been writing your own music?

I’ve been composing music from the age of seven and I started composing instinctively,
three weeks after my piano was delivered.

  1. Who are your top three influences and why?

My top three influences are:

Chopin, because of the way he uses the full scale of the piano in his pieces and also his
diversity is impressive.

Franz Listz, because I love his romantic pieces and he was so technically amazing, that people
were given smelling salts when they attented his Concerts, just in case they fainted!

I also like a pop Artist called Synchro. He produces minimalist music, with subtle variations
of a single theme and I sometimes apply this concept to my music, when composing pieces
that are suitable for film/TV.

  1. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

My current release is called Mrs Matisse, who was the wife of Henri Matisse, the well known
painter.

I saw the painting and the colours translated into music that I could hear playing in my head.
i sat at a piano and out came Mrs Matisse. Then I discovered that Debussy had composed a
piece of music about the very same painting. I had no idea, it was just a coincidence.

6. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I’m based in Woking, Surrey. My favourite venues in the area, are the H’G. Wells Events Centre
and G Live. I played a solo Concert at the H.G. Wells, (where Paul Weller sometimes performs).
I haven’t played G Live, but I’m working on that one!!

7. Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

The best place to find me on line is to go to my website. www.shanethomas.co.uk

Good Guy Dies

Good GD

  1. How did you get your initial start in music?

For Cherry, it all began when she was little girl, standing on a chair singing to entertain family members at informal get-togethers.

For Joe, it was seeing old footage of Rory Gallagher playing live on RTE back in N. Ireland. He then proceeded to beg his father to buy him his first guitar.

  1. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

       To headline Madison Square Garden, win song of the year at The Grammys and then play a gig at Folsom prison.

  1. How long have you been writing your own music?

Cherry has been writing songs since childhood, and Joe since the moment he picked up a guitar.        They started writing together in 2012.

  1. Who are your top three influences and why?

Cherry explains that her idols are “Bjork, because she doesn’t give a damn about being crazy, Tori Amos for the way she makes love to the piano when she plays it, and Jonathan Davies from Korn for his voice, his honesty and his intimacy.

For Joe it was “Gary Moore, because in my humble opinion he was the greatest guitar player ever to pick up the instrument; Rory Gallagher because he was a fantastic player and an incredible frontman- his shows were electrifying; and Phil Lynott because he had spellbinding stage presence, was a great songwriter and an amazing romantic poet.”

  1. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

The single ‘Hit Me Back’ is based on a story of a relationship which spirals into domestic violence and confronts the idea that love can be expressed in a relationship through violence. This has been drawn from Cherry’s background, as that particular belief is rife through many Eastern European relationships – a saying in Russia being “if he hits me, he loves me”. This song is a rallying cry from Cherry and Joe, to women all over the world to stop hiding their abuse.

  1. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

The band are based in London. Cherry lives in Hoxton where she describes the scene as “vibrant, brave and experimental” and  Joe lives in Brockley, where there’s a “small, intimate scene”. The guys’ favourite venue they’ve played to date is the 229 in Great Portland St and the oddest one was at a deserted airport in Riga, Latvia, as part of a midsummer night’s carnival.

  1. Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Joe says “As far as new bands go there’s an outfit called Speaks who are a hardcore hip hop outfit from Brighton, who are really nutty, very experimental, and bring rock guitars into the mix.” Cherry says “I really like FKA Twigs, she’s got a certain poise, sexuality and elegance.” 

  1. Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

www.facebook.com/goodguydies

www.twitter.com/goodguydies

The guys release their debut single “Hit Me Back” on Fri 14th November with the accompanying video. It’ll be available to download exclusively from itunes.

You can also catch Good Guy Dies live at the following shows.

Fri 31st October: The Enterprise, 2 Haverstock Hill, Camden, London, NW3 2BL. Onstage 8.15pm

 Saturday 15th November: The Scala, 275 Pentonville Rd, King’s Cross, London, N1 9NL (supporting Primal Scream and The Libertines). Stage time TBC.

 

Lydia Kakabadse

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  1. How did you get your initial start in music?

By having my works performed by amateur chamber groups, singers and orchestras.

  1. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

To be more widely known

  1. How long have you been writing your own music?

Since the age of 13

  1. Who are your top three influences and why?

My music is mainly influenced by mediaeval music; nineteenth century music and Middle Eastern music

  1. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Of the 5 pieces on this release, I wrote the Latin words for The Phantom Listeners and the English text for The Mermaid; I wrote The Song of the Shirt when I was 15; the 2 string quartets – Arabian Rhapsody Suite and Russian Tableaux – are written for violin, viola, cello and double bass (rather than the traditional 2 violins, viola and cello)

  1. Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

www.lydiakakabadse.com click on “Discography” and scroll down and click on “Presto Classical” and then click on “listen”