Get to Know: Indie-Electronic Artist Atticus

How did you get your initial start in music?

I was into songwriting from an early age, almost by accident. My first memory of it was primary school. We were doing a song in class the next day and the teacher asked if anyone could play the guitar. Nobody put there hand up so I did. I thought, how hard can it be? Turns out it was hard and I stayed up well past my bedtime learning the song on my mums old guitar. I later taught myself piano and the basics of production.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

Weirdly I haven’t thought about my eventual aim, I make music because I love making music. Sometimes I wrote to help myself through personal situations. I guess it’s the more soulful and emotional stuff that cuts through. If my music can really resonate with one person then that’s not a failure right?

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

When my mum died at 16 my music really kicked on as I put down on paper all of the confusion I was feeling at that point. I’m 24 and the emotion that drove that music is still very much prevalent in what I make now. Only the way in which I create has evolved.

 

Who are your top three influences and why?

Ooooh that’s a tough one. As with many people my parents were a big influence on what I listened to. I still remember the 6 cd changer in my dads car. Bowie and Fleetwood mac (‘roomers’ of course). Bowie certainly influenced my style, in the staccato way in which I compose, allowing raw vocals plenty of space to cut through. More recently I’ve listened to a lot of Chet Faker (Nick Murphy) he’s all about dynamics in his music, something I’ve tried to encapsulate in mine.

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

It was written out of a desire to be appreciated by my pears. Something I care much less about now, but it’s still relevant. Music, relationships, life isn’t easy and sometimes you can be banging on the door for so long until someone hears you.

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I’m living in London now but I’m from Leeds. The Leeds music scene has so much history of bringing soul and indie music together. I really got a buzz from playing in old venues like the 360 club and the Brude (Brudenell social club). London is different again, and the 02 arena is a different kettle of fish.

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

I worked with a band called Sam Scout a bit. They are insane.

Give our readers a roundup of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

My debut song ‘these walls’ launches on the 24th but if they are really nice to me I’ll come play it in their bedrooms. Follow me on Facebook @officialATTICUS.

 

Links:

https://soundcloud.com/officialatticus

https://www.facebook.com/officialATTICUS

Get to Know: Elsiane

How did you get your initial start in music?

We each have different backgrounds individually but as a band we started jamming in the year 2000 – just vocals, drums and guitar, then started writing some songs. The first song that we did together was ‘Vaporous’. After that we ended up recording several demo EPs and did some shows in Montreal

Elsieanne: I started singing at the age of 6 and grew up in a family of musicians. At the age of 12 started playing guitar and then violin. It was after seeing my grand father perform with his orchestra and later seeing Phil Collins live that I wanted to become a musician/singer

Stephane: From an early age I became musically aware – music was first an escape and I was passionate about starting a band, but It wasn’t until the age of 16 when I knew I wanted to play the drums. For me music started by playing in a band.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

Elsieanne: My aim in the industry is to be able to continue staying true to our work and not have to change who you are in order to please others.

I wish the industry did not want to change artists to become more commercial all because they need to make money. It would be great if labels would develop artists to their max potential and let them be.

Stephane : My ultimate aim would be to keep continuing on this path that we have already being on for the last 16 years as a band. In terms of goals, I would like to see our music get proper sync licenses, to find the right home for the songs. Our music can be described as cinematic in many ways, and a perfect for film soundtracks. I want more people to discover this music by playing shows as well as continuing recording albums and to continue generating a steady fan base.

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

Elsieanne: Since the age of 13. I recorded my first demo EP at 14 with just guitar and vocals.

Stephane: I have always been in bands that creates original music. With the band Elsiane, 17 years.

 

Who are your top three influences and why? 

Elsieanne: Peter Gabriel, Yma Sumac, Massive Attack

First major influence: Tool because they are a band that has always followed their own rules, and kept the mystery in what they have always done. Their art is as important as music and they have never shied away from that. They have proved that you can get away with what you want in the music industry. As a drummer, I was very influenced by compositional drummers like Danny Carey from Tool.

Second influence: Massive Attack because they have created a unique style of music which has inspired me for many years. The darker elements of Massive Attack are what I enjoy the most as well as the different collaborations they do with the many talented singers and musicians involved with the band.

Third: NIN (Trent Reznor) because he continuously tries to push the envelope with every new album and has never let his guard down.

 

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Elsieanne: This album is made to inspire other artists to stay true to who they are and not give up no matter how hard the road may be.

Stephane: We would rather people make up their own minds about what they hear on this album, but I guess that you must see the darkness before you can see the light.

 

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

We’re based in Montreal. Indie rock seems to be a favourite here since the early 2000s. There’s a big electronic scene as well, we don’t pay too much attention on what’s happening here but some favourite venues include: Club Soda, La Tulipe, Gesu, Place des Arts.

 

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Caroline Plante, Curious Case, Patrick Watson.

 

Check out more on Elsiane here:

Links:

http://www.elsiane.com/

https://www.facebook.com/elsiane

https://twitter.com/elsiane

https://www.instagram.com/elsiane_official/

https://soundcloud.com/elsiane

https://www.youtube.com/user/vaporous07/videos

GET TO KNOW: Jake Aldridge

How did you get your initial start in music?

I started out when I was 17. My Father passed away when I was 11 and from that point on, I was always searching for a way to express myself and my emotions. Music became like my own therapy and I enjoyed the feeling of being creative. The positive reactions from people who heard my music spurred me on and keeps me going to this day, some 12 years later.

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

My ultimate aim? That’s a good one, It’s never been about money for me but I guess my ultimate aim would be to make a living out of my music, even if it was just a small one. This way I could put all of my energy into it. It’s not easy to write and promote new music around a full time job, but i certainly do my best.

How long have you been writing your own music?

I’ve been writing my own music for 12 years. It’s gone quickly too. I’ve always written my own stuff and have never really considered covering other people’s. I enjoy the writing process too much.

Who are your top three influences and why?

My top 3 influences would be 1. Tupac Shakur. His work ethic inspired me and his authenticity did too. He was very much a lyricist and I loved that as well. Number 2 would be probably be Nelly. I love that he can seamlessly combine R&B & Hip-Hop, it’s something i try to do in my music as well. I love that he’s not afraid to sing on his tracks either. Number 3 would probably be Nas. I love how he’s never really steered away from the music and sound that he’s always been known for. He never sold out. His music is real and I admire that so much.

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Definitely, my new single is titled ‘Fireman’ and I honestly feel like it’s my best one yet ! It features Lisa Ambrose, who is a singer i’ve always loved and i feel truly honoured to be able to work alongside. The track also features production by Ninety II. He’s a producer from Bristol and he and I have been working together for some time now. We’re like Batman & Robin !! The track is set for release via ITunes, Spotify & Google Play etc on the 7th of April.

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I’m based in Suffolk and to be honest the local scene isn’t really geared up for my kind of my music but i try to get it around as much as i can. i’ve received great support from local people as well as the press here too.

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Definitely Lisa Abrose, Steve Moyse, Haleana,  Kelly Jenns and Kelly Brooks. I’ve worked with them all and they are incredible at what they do.

Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

The best place to listen to my music is my website – www.jakealdridge.com you can also sign up for my mailing list and receive some free tracks as well !!

Get To Know: Warsaw Radio

  1. How did you get your initial start in music?

As band we all come from different backgrounds with different influences including rock, pop and classical. Nicola Bates (violin & vocals) has toured with the English Orchestra and Sting, Brían McNamara (lead singer/guitarist) comes from a folk rock background and honed his craft playing venues in bars from New York to San Francisco and Dublin. Laurence Bridge (Bass guitar) has performed in the past with likes of Lucie Barrat (sister of the famous Libertine) and Tom Odell. We’ve merged these influences together to create a unique sound.

 

  1. What would be your ultimate aim in the industry

To make music and to try and stick around for as long as we can.

 

  1. How long have you been writing your own music?

We’ve been writing together since we started the band in Brighton in 2013.

 

  1. Who are your top three influences and why?

Our sound taps from a well of music that includes Wilco, Fleetwood Mac and The Waterboys. They influence us as they have made some incredible music that will stand the test of time.

 

  1. Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Its available on Spotify, Amazon and ITunes from March 10th

 

  1. Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

We’re based in the sea-side town of Brighton. The local scene is a vibrant one with great venues such as The Hope & Ruin and The Green Door Store. We feel lucky to call it home.

 

  1. Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Rotait are an incredible two piece alt-rock act (cello and drums – think Damien Rice meets The White Stripes) and Paul Murray is one of the finest solo troubadours we’ve seen.

 

  1. Give our readers a roundup of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

You can find us on all the usual music media channels – Spotify, You Tube,  Amazon, ITunes etc

Follow us on Twitter / FB for all the latest news & gig updates:

facebook.com/warsawradio

twitter.com/warsawradio

GET TO KNOW: Adam Lanceley

How did you get your initial start in music?

Well, after a near fatal car crash which left me unable to walk for a long time & needing something to fill the void left by my inability to play competitive sport, my interests turned more towards the arts. That’s the start of what got me into the creative side of things, but I suppose it was a gradual process of circumstances that came together over quite a long time, like a friend from college being a sound engineer or a colleague at a job – who was already teaching me the guitar – encouraging me to start writing my ideas down & trying to put them in a song. Basically though, just plugging away & I’ve been lucky to meet the right people at the right time – hope it continues!

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

Good question. I suppose for me, the ultimate goal is to leave my mark on on music. To leave a footprint on life that’s revisited whenever people hear my music & bring back the vibe they had when they first heard it.

How long have you been writing your own music?

Probably about 15 years. I’ve always had a lot of ideas in me that at first I was unable to express. At first I tried to do it through acting, but it didn’t really work for me trying to be someone else when I had so many issues of my own that I wanted to communicate with the world. It was after I left East 15 Acting School – 1 of the Centres of Excellence for Drama – that I realised I was more suited to saying what I had to say through music.

Who are your top 3 influences & why?

First & foremost, The Beatles. They were the group that really made me fall in love with music. When I first heard them, it was quite a difficult time in my life & I found strength in their unique sunshine sound. They have influenced my writing & production techniques a lot.

I think some of REM’s stuff is great! I love Michael Stipe’s use of metaphors & trying to figure out what some of his words actually mean. This has influenced my writing too.

Roy Orbison is another big influence on my music. I love his approach – where not being trained in music I think it gave him the licence to use unorthodox structures & writing techniques. This gave me the confidence to write by the principle: if it sounds good, do it!

Is there anything you’d like people to know about your current release?

I think that the less you tell people about what your songs are about the better! It’s good to let the listener interpret your lyrics & music in the way they want, in my opinion. 1 thing I do want people to know though is the single & the EP it’s off – ‘Back To The Sunshine’ – is a charity release with all net proceeds going to The Brain & Spine Foundation. They are at the forefront of research into the treatment of brain injury & after my own personal experiences of how traumatic the recovery can be, I think they are a charity well worth supporting.

Where are you based & what’s your local music scene like? Any favourite venues?

I’m from south west London & there’s quite a big music heritage here! The Olympic Studios were near where I’m from, where everyone who’s anyone used to record way back when… from The Rolling Stones to The Beach Boys & The Eagles – they all recorded in Barnes! There’s always something going on music wise in London. My favourite venue to play is ‘The Fighting Cocks’ in Kingston. This might have something to do with it being a venue Jimi Hendrix used to play when he was based in Kingston!

Who else can you recommend from your local music scene for people to have a listen to?

There’s always a wide variety of music in London. Whatever your taste your bound to find something that suits! 1 group worth checking out are ‘The Groove Monkeys’.

Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online & hear more of your music.

I have 5 studio albums that preceded this release. You can find them on most free stream or download stores if you just enter Adam Lanceley. Enjoy!

GET TO KNOW: Beldon Haigh

How did you get your initial start in music?

I’m not sure what the initial start really is. In music as in life we have lots of starts. They are all like relationships. Some are exciting adrenaline fuelled and filled with dreams they go off like a rocket at the start, sometimes stay like that, sometimes go nowhere. Other beginnings are less dynamic, more stop start, more idiosyncratic they lead somewhere gratifying/fulfilling at the time but lack ultimate direction. That is a good way to look at the music business – hard to find the start point, and only after reflection can you see the roads that ultimately led anywhere.  That’s why it’s always a good idea to value the actual journey – love the journey as much as the final destination.

And personally I think that the start in music always comes from yourself.

Every musician needs to value their effort, I’ve worked with many musicians and its easy for people to forget to value themselves, their own direction, their own talent enough. Not valuing yourself can be a one way ticket to drug addiction or alcoholism or worse. So musically speaking, I was the one who made the decision to practice and apply myself and I took responsibility for my music, my writing and my life and  I am pretty happy with what I have done with all of that.

That said I hugely appreciate all the people who have helped me along the way. My folks bought me a guitar and got me lessons when I was 10. We didn’t have a lot of money and in a way I’m glad we didn’t, I bought my first electric guitar out of proceeds from paper round/milk round and working in Asda when I was 14 – it was a Yamaha Pacifica – still a great guitar. I loved that guitar.

My music teacher Jock Archibald had a huge influence on me and really helped me develop classical guitar technique, my high school headmaster Hugh Lynch let the band I was in rehearse in the school at weekends so long as we’d play charity concerts in return – which we did. That gave us the opportunity to practice in a big hall with awesome acoustics.

After that I many people helped me from guys who owned studios and record company people who helped me along the way. Just a few people include Jon Turner (studio owner) Chris Harley ) producer) Brian Guthrie (from the Cartell in Scotland who we released our first record through) promoter and label owner)  Mark Mackie (promoter) John Kennedy (lawyer) David White (lawyer and Simple Minds Management team who also advised us for a while) and  Malcolm Buckland  (A&R ) and Dominic Walker who looked after me at BMG and is the current head of music at the BBC he’s been great in his support and encouragement me even to this day. Also, Justin Skelton my Manager and my friend.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

I don’t have an ultimate aim. I want to be happy every day. I live my life with good intentions and I aim to make a positive and constructive impact in whatever I do.

I would like to inspire others to write about real things and produce songs that move people.

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

Since I was 10 years old, I’ve written and recorded hundreds of songs. That’s the great thing about having had a studio for as long as I can remember. Everything is recorded – some good, bad, indifferent, but all recorded.

 

Who are your top three influences and why?

I love so many really current acts. I listen a lot to Jungle and Elbow, Arcade Fire… there’s a huge  list.

And yet when really pushed on three influences I would go with:

David Bowie – magical voice, timeless prophetic lyrics and very classy music – just everything. Life on Mars is one of my favourite songs of all time.

John Lennon – Genius song writer with a spellbinding voice and mega attitude – Imagine has to be the perfect song.

Jimmy Hendrix – excellent songwriter, genius with a guitar and production that was truly decades ahead of its time – there are so many Hendrix songs still used today in TV commercials because they are timeless and packed with atmosphere and symbolism.

And I’d still need to sneak in a mention for Elvis Costello and Bob Dylan – two of the finest songwriters that will ever live.

 

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

Freedom came to me in a dream, I woke up and wrote it all down. I got 90 percent done in 20 minutes but the final 10 percent took a lot longer. But it is a song that seemed to be gifted to me, I never decided to sit down and write an anti Trump song – but and what he stands for and what he was doing was clearly concerning me greatly and he that hasn’t changed.  If anything I get more concerned with every tweet he spits out and every executive order he signs.

I think that we all need to stand up and do our bit to prevent this alt right cancer from taking hold. We cannot afford to be complacent. We can’t leave it to other people. If we value freedom we need to fight for it, or it will be taken from us. It is already happening.  Everyone can do something. Talk on social media, protest, sing songs, give money. We must never let this alt right behaviour and authoritarian, nationalistic, fascist/ racist ideology be normalised.

 

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I live in Falkirk in Scotland, there is a very good local music scene here particularly in Glasgow and Edinburgh which are both very close.

My favourite venue has always been is Glasgow Barrowlands the vibe, the acoustics and even the size of the place are all just perfect – not too big , not too small.

 

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

Favourite Scottish band of the moment is Glasvegas and the small venue I like the most is the Mash House in Edinburgh – because it is where (IMHO) all the best good Scottish indy bands play. There is always some good talent on display there.

 

Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

https://twitter.com/beldonhaigh

https://www.facebook.com/Beldon-Haigh-Freedom-An-Anti-Trump-Protest-Song-1270990246327550/?fref=ts

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/freedom/id1195525999?i=1195526008

GET TO KNOW: Mike Maro

How did you get your initial start in music?

I remember quite clearly, I was 8 years old when a 16 years old friend of mine was rapping the lyrics to Sisquo’s “Unleash the Dragon” and I was so intrigued by this. From then on, I instantly became attracted to the art of being able to memorise and sing songs. I began my journey by constantly repeating all the songs I liked and buying various lyric books to learn the lyrics to my favourite songs.

Aside from rapping I was especially attracted to my church’s choir and only fully decided to become part of it when a girl I had a crush on was involved. Joining the choir taught me how to sing in a range of notes and gave me the first ears I now have for instrument and voice harmonisation.

 

What would be your ultimate aim in the industry?

Becoming the best version of me I can possibly be. This makes so much sense to me because I believe once you are your true self, it will be much harder for others to plagiarize your work without sounding unoriginal. I want to set a distinct mark for who Mike Maro is and make it very easy for people who feel the music to understand why they feel that way.

Asides this, my ultimate aim is to be seen as more than a rapper. I try my best to tell stories and say things that are relevant to the world we live in today. In this way I can be a part of helping shape the communities we live in and be a source of hope to my listeners.

Lastly, I want to make music that is timeless and be remembered as someone who overcame circumstances surrounding him and leave a mark that will be untouched through out history.

 

How long have you been writing your own music?

I started writing when I was 11 years old and I’m 23 now, so that is almost 13 years.

 

Who are your top three influences and why?

This is a really hard question because I have so many influences but Tupac Shakur would have to be one of them. This is because of what he stood for as an artist and how potent his work is till today. He spoke about things we still can’t fail to mention today and I admire his work ethic and what he was able to accomplish in a matter of 6 years.

Jay Z is a huge influence to me because of how consistent he has been in his career. I respect the fact that he has given kids a vision to see for their selves that no matter what an A&R or Record Label Exec says to you (in terms of not making it), that doesn’t matter because your ambition is greater. The fact that he has given so much back to his community and being able to not get shadowed by  his music alone is something I will always be moved by.

Another one of my influences has to be Drake. I can remember how music was before Drake and that sentence alone is why I respect his influence. The fact that I now know that being your original self is the only right way in this business is because of people like Drake. He was able to move the world simply by putting out what’s real to him out there.

 

Is there anything you would like people to know about your current release?

I actually wrote the lyrics for the song in 2013 and they stuck with me since then so I felt the need to put that into the world. Also, the first part of it is called 0-100, a song originally performed by Drake. You can find a link to this on my soundcloud.

 

Where are you based and what’s your local scene like? Any favourite venues?

I am currently living in Bromley. I am quite new here so am still exploring the scene. However, I tend to branch out to East Croydon, Hoodoos venue in particular. I like that spot because I get to watch live music from different genres such as rock, folk, jazz etc. as well as be a part of the performing artists there.

 

Who else can you recommend from your local scene for people to have a listen to?

From the people I have had the chance to work with or be around (From Nottingham) – I’ll recommend Mr Virgo who is a DJ and produces bassline beats. He has just dropped an EP titled “Bits”.

A really cool rapper to listen to is Tey Chaplin – you can find his project “Die Hard” on soundcloud.

Also another dope MC is Snowy from Nottingham.

 

Give our readers a round up of where they can find you online and hear more of your music.

I am currently using my YouTube channel and Soundcloud as my major outlets for the music I am making. You can also stay updated on various projects I am working on by following my social media pages.